Jenny: Crocheting Irish Roses

The Irish Rose pattern is old, old, old, as old as Irish lace.  Of course the lace roses were done with thread and a tiny hook, and I use yarn and a much bigger hook, but the pattern is the same.  Bonus: no working into stitches, it’s all worked into loops.  If you can chain, sc, hdc, and dc, you can make an Irish Rose. (Note to people who are considering learning crochet: those are all plain, beginner stitches.)

IRISH ROSE

First/3 Ch Loop Row:
Chain 4 for anchor loop and to stand in for the first double crochet, then another three for the loop you’ll need to crochet the petals.

 

 

 

 

Then double crochet in the first chain, chain 3.

 

 

 

 

Repeat five times for six petal loops, ending with a slip stitch in the middle of the beginning ch 6.   Six loops made.

 

 

 

 

First/Small Petal Row:
In each ch 3 loop, make one petal– sc, hdc, three dc, hdc, sc–in each 3ch loop, working around until there are six petals, one in each loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second/4 Ch Loop Row:
Turn the flower over and slip stitch around that first ch 3 from the first loop row.  [Ch4, slip stitch around the next dc from the first loop row], repeating six times to make six loops.

 

 

 

 

 

Second/Medium Petal Row:
Working behind first/small petal row, make one medium petal– sc, hdc, five dc, hdc, sc–in each 4ch loop, working around until there are six petals, one in each loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third/5 Ch Loop Row:
Turn the flower over and slip stitch around that first dc from the second loop row.  [Ch5, slip stitch around the next dc from the first loop row], repeating six times to make six ch5 loops.

Third/Large Petal Row:
Working behind second/medium petal row, make one large petal– sc, hdc, seven dc, hdc, sc–in each 5ch loop, working around until there are six petals, one in each loop.
After you’ve done a couple, they’re so easy, you can do them while you talk, watch TV and movies, brainstorm books, anything.  I keep a basket of leftover yarn and a crochet hook by my TV chair so that I have something to do with my hands.
What can you do with Irish roses?
Sew them to things like hats:

Glue them to things like tape measures:
Make a bunch and string them together for scarves.
(Okay, the scarf pictured below is just the roses pinned in place because I’m going to need to make about six more to get a decent length.  So pretend there are six more roses on there and that they’re sewed together.  Thank you).
Tie the roses to packages instead of bows, pin them on a coat in place of a corsage, make a ring for the center instead of using the first chain and put them over buttons as button covers or over knobs as backing plates on drawers, or glue one to your stick shift, or thread the laces on your kids’ sneakers through the center holes, or sew them to your dog’s collar, or . . . actually, pretty much the sky’s the limit with Irish roses.  Knock yourself out.

30 thoughts on “Jenny: Crocheting Irish Roses

  1. Courtney says:

    Hi Jenny,

    Those are just gorgeous. I was wondering how you learned to crochet? I can knit and even took a class in crochet but I just can’t seem to grasp it. I love the look of crochet and would like to learn. Any recommendations?

    Thanks!
    Courtney

  2. Diane (TT) says:

    Well, that’s well beyond my current capabilities (the only crochet projects I have done are snoods: I saw Ginger Rogers wearing one in The Major and the Minor and said “I must have one!”. Sadly, no snood in the world can make my hair look like Ginger Rogers’). But I may be induced to learn. Certainly I have tons of yarn (I knit, although mostly just hedgehogs these days), and even a few hooks.

    The hat is fabulous. I love hats (although that one would not flatter me; it makes me think of Maisie Dobbs, whose new book I will be buying) – my first response on being told that the Sanctuary Choir has no responsibilities this Sunday (a local school choir is singing and leading in worship) was not “I can sleep in!”, but “I can wear a hat!”. I hope that I remember to do so.

  3. Ylva Hedin says:

    Oh MY God. I couldnt do that even if my life depended on it! It looks beutiful…

    Tell me to make a 3 course dinner to 20 people I would do that in a few hours but art like this… no can do! Im impressed!

  4. I learned to crochet when my grandmother got tired of making the little yellow centers for her granny squares and made me do them. I think I was five or six.

    The hat was five bucks on sale at Target. I love Target sales.

    • German Chocolate Betty says:

      My paternal grandmother taught me to crochet. I was, oh, maybe 10?? I made a bunch of crocheted vests in the mid/late 60s (totally hip, ha).

      Knitting I taught myself. I never made a scarf. My first project was (believe it or not) an Aran cardigan. I don’t believe in starting small.

      The roses are TOOOO cute. I may have to start crocheting again. Haven’t done any in AGES (well, if you don’t include crocheted finishes on knitting projects…)

  5. Kelly S says:

    The images for the instructions are very impressive! Are they examples of your increasing knowledge of Photoshop?

  6. Micki says:

    Those are excellent instructions . . . the pics and the chart AND the words all add up to something I can understand! (I’m struggling with the abbreviations-only pattern for a snowflake quilt right now . . . somehow, I think I got seven arms on the snowflake )-:. Oh well, plenty of yarn.)

    (-: And the STEALTH tape measure made me laugh. Tape measures are so . . . ordinary and blah. (-: I wonder what you could do with a light saber sheath.

    • That’s a phallic symbol joke, right? I only ask because I’m a big Big Bang Theory fan and they’ve never unleashed a light saber without a penis reference.

      • Micki says:

        LOL, penis references go right over my head. This would be more vaginal than phallic, wouldn’t it? Which would fit the theme PERFECTLY! (The Crochet Force Knightess taunts the villian: “Whassamatta? Big Bad Darth Vader doesn’t want black Irish roses on his light saber sheath?? A guy secure in his masculinity could carry off the look . . . .”)

        • Micki says:

          but yeah . . . there seems to be something very masculine about a tape measure. Don’t ask me what, but it seems to be on several layers (guys measure things, guys measure *their* things, it protrudes and retracts . . . I probably need Bob Newhart to tell me, “We don’t go there.”).

  7. Yep, those Irish roses make me want to attempt crochet again. I hope I can divert myself with something else – I still have an unfinished boa scarf from the post on Argh. I can’t figure it out!

  8. Now I would pay to dl a discussion about story as it relates to fiber arts… you, Lani, Krissie sitting there with your crochet, knitting and quilting, dispensing homilies:

    “No matter how good your technical skills are, you have to start with a quality yarn or the book/sweater will be crap.”

    “Don’t worry about weaving in the loose ends of your work until you’re done. That’s what revision is for.”

    etc. 🙂

  9. Cindy says:

    I have to give these a whirl, the directions make them look fairly easy, unlike the flowers I tried on my own and well, were lopsided……….I too, would love a picture/directions of the hedgehogs! (I have had them as pets, they’re tons of fun, and nocturnal!)

    • Where did you get hedgehogs for pets???? Oh, maybe you are one of the Brits? We don’t have them in America do we? I’m pretty sure not, but I was in another fender bender today and my brain got rattled! (really I’m fine.)

  10. First thought is: who do I know who can/will make these Irish roses for me? I love the necklet! So could wear it at all the old rose conferences I go to. Light to pack too. Don’t know if the Japanese old rosers will go gaga, but the Australians I know will —

  11. those are the best instructions ever….now, try it using wire…you get the best jewelry irish roses. really it works. use a steel hook size 4 hook, you can go smaller if you have a death wish i have used 11but we don’t have to go there….

    i don’t just use sterling or fine silver wire anymore the cost is so high but there is an excellent non tarnish silver wire made by para wire that is excellent and if you stick to 26, the heavy, 28 good choice and 30 lightest…you do good. i can’t remember what i used o the butterflies from Unfortunate misfortunes…
    have fun…you can check my website for more samples of wire crochet

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